Good Samaritans face moral dilemma in helping others


By Sun Xiaochen

A Lanzhou resident surnamed Li helps an elderly man who was hit by a car in the capital of Gansu province on Nov 25. Li tried to contact the man’s family, but could not reach them. The man was later sent to a senior citizens’ home. — Lu Xi, 32, an office clerk in Beijing, tried to explain to her 4-year-old daughter why sometimes it is not a good idea to extend a helping hand to an elderly person who falls over on the street.
“She knows from what she’s learned in kindergarten that it’s a virtue to help the elderly. But reports of some recent cases where those who offered their assistance found themselves in trouble have given me second thoughts,” said Lu.
She is among an increasing number of Chinese people who have found it hard to offer help to others when the need arises.
On June 15, an elderly woman in Dazhou, Sichuan province, fell over in the street and broke her leg. Three primary school students managed to help her up, but she then accused them of having knocked her down and asked their families to pay 20,000 yuan [db:内容2]